Does future tense help keep goodwill alive?

When a verb refers to the future, some languages require explicit marking of that fact. A recent paper presents evidence that companies in countries using those languages are slow in reporting goodwill as impaired. The paper suggests that this is because speakers of those languages perceive the future as more distant than speakers of other… Continue reading Does future tense help keep goodwill alive?

Finding out what users need

To set good accounting standards, standard-setters need to understand deeply how users of financial statements use and process financial information. One very useful report on this topic area was an academic literature review The use of information by capital providers produced in 2013, by a team of 6 academics: Stefano Cascino, Mark Clatworthy, Beatriz García… Continue reading Finding out what users need

The ‘cash component of revenue’: a dangerous myth?

Some academics and investors often talk about ‘the cash component of revenue’. I understand why they use this shorthand label, but it risks causing misunderstanding. In this post, I examine the following: what is the ‘cash component of revenue’? an accounting identity linking revenue and cash receipts judgement in measuring trade receivables the ‘cash component… Continue reading The ‘cash component of revenue’: a dangerous myth?

The hardest question in standard-setting?

When accounting standard-setters have to make decisions about recognition and measurement, they often face two competing claims: some people argue that investors will under-react if companies are forced to recognise something; but other people argue that investors will over-react if companies are forced to recognise that thing. Standard-setters would love to get evidence that would… Continue reading The hardest question in standard-setting?