Tell investors about your crypto

There has recently been turmoil in the world of cryptocurrencies and cryptocurrency exchanges.  So, are companies disclosing enough about their holdings of cryptocurrencies and other crypto-assets? If they are not, should the IASB take any action? This post discusses the following: For brevity, in the rest of this post, I use the term cryptocurrencies to… Continue reading Tell investors about your crypto

First-time adoption of IFRS Standards: too many new exemptions?

The IASB issued IFRS 1 First-time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards in 2003. Under IFRS 1, entities switching to IFRS Standards must apply those standards in full, with some limited transitional modifications. The Basis for Conclusions on IFRS 1 describes the decision-making framework the IASB used in deciding what transitional modifications to include in… Continue reading First-time adoption of IFRS Standards: too many new exemptions?

The ‘cash component of revenue’: a dangerous myth?

Some academics and investors often talk about ‘the cash component of revenue’. I understand why they use this shorthand label, but it risks causing misunderstanding. In this post, I examine the following: what is the ‘cash component of revenue’? an accounting identity linking revenue and cash receipts judgement in measuring trade receivables the ‘cash component… Continue reading The ‘cash component of revenue’: a dangerous myth?

Saying how likely something is: way forward

IFRS standards use too many different terms to say how likely it is that an event will occur. And different people using IFRS Standards interpret those terms in different ways. Those clear messages appeared in a research report issued in 2016 by the Korea Accounting Standards Board (KASB) and Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB). I… Continue reading Saying how likely something is: way forward

Those mushrooming effective date paragraphs

The IASB has a problem with effective date paragraphs.  There are far too many of them and their number keeps growing. I believe it is time to find a better approach to writing these paragraphs. What does the IASB do now? When the IASB amends a standard, it also adds to that standard a paragraph… Continue reading Those mushrooming effective date paragraphs

Selecting a measurement basis

The additions in 2018 to the IASB’s Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting included a table summarising what information various measurement basis provide. It seems that people have paid little attention to that table. In this post, I highlight that table, summarise its role and content, and explain why it is important.   Role of table… Continue reading Selecting a measurement basis

Saying how likely something is: research methodology

In a separate post today, I summarised research by the Korea Accounting Standards Board (KASB) and Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB). That research looked into how preparers of financial statements and auditors interpret various terms used in IFRS Standards to denote how likely an event is. https://accountingmiscellany.com/saying-how-likely-something-is In this post, I comment on 2 aspects… Continue reading Saying how likely something is: research methodology

Saying how likely something is

IFRS standards use too many different terms to describe how likely it is that an event will occur. That is a clear conclusion of KASB Research Report No. 39 / AASB Research Report No. 2 Accounting Judgements on Terms of Likelihood in IFRS: Korea and Australia, issued in 2016 by the Korea Accounting Standards Board… Continue reading Saying how likely something is

The hardest question in standard-setting?

When accounting standard-setters have to make decisions about recognition and measurement, they often face two competing claims: some people argue that investors will under-react if companies are forced to recognise something; but other people argue that investors will over-react if companies are forced to recognise that thing. Standard-setters would love to get evidence that would… Continue reading The hardest question in standard-setting?

Putting the wrong kinds of numbers in P&L won’t help save the planet

Many companies will need to spend a lot of money reshaping their businesses to help save the planet. Some environmental campaigners say that companies should book all that spending as liabilities today. They argue that booking that spending today would make investors focus on that information and that investors would then put pressure on companies… Continue reading Putting the wrong kinds of numbers in P&L won’t help save the planet